Friday finds #2

Zoological snippets from around the web

General

An animal flatulence quiz. I need to buy the book to improve my score on this!

What words are most used by environmental historians and environmental humanities scholars? (Not strictly zoology-based, but full of interesting links).

Birds

Updating Singapore’s bird list

Following the success of fox grading, grading parrots has now arrived.

Fish

All about fish surgery.

Genetics

The safety of DNA testing.

Reptiles and amphibians

The latest edition of the Herpetological Highlights podcast came out this week, covering a variety of topics from species recovery to maternal care in a species of python and crab-eating snakes.

Invertebrates

I enjoy scientific cartoons, and Paige Kelly’s Science and Scribbles is a blog I found recently which combines both cartoons and stories. Her most recent drawing is about krill, salps and diatoms.

 

Do you have any Friday finds? Share them in the comments!

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A member of the crab-eating snake family. 

 

Friday Finds #1

This is a new idea I’m trying out. I aim to bring you zoological snippets from around the web:

Mammals 

  • Lynx fighting sounds very unusual, and the video is well worth a watch.
  • March Mammal Madness is well worth following and participating in (these are the results so far).

Amphibians

Reptiles 

Birds

  • Puffin sunglasses  are very fashionable, and can be used when studying ultraviolet light and their bills.

Invertebrates

  • A new species of fiddler crab has been found in the Indian Ocean.

 

Do you have any Friday finds of your own? Share them in the comments!

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My 2018 zoology goals

Inspired by this post  on Barcode Ecology, and in no particular order:

  1. See a British red squirrel. Having seen them in mainland Europe (and now that I study close to Anglesey, where they are making a comeback), I would love to see one in the UK.
  2. Update this blog at least every other week (going well so far).
  3.  Start a pan-species list for British wildlife. This will hopefully help me keep up with my species sightings.
  4. Go to a conference I haven’t attended before.
  5. Attend at least one training course.

I will update this list (and blog about the goals) during the year.

Feel free to share your zoology goals in the comments!